Going Mobile

thThe Wall Street Journal last Friday reported that more than half of all page views of online real estate listings now occur on mobile devices like smart phones and tablets, overtaking traditional desktop searches especially in high-end markets like here on Bainbridge Island. And, mobile users make five times as many property searches as web users.

Here at Coldwell Banker McKenzie, we give every listing its own individual webpage, and we imbed our promotional print material (flyers, ads, etc.) with a QR code that takes the mobile user directly to a mobile-friendly page that can actually be read. So if you stop in front of one of our listings, just scan the QR code on the yard sign or flyer and you can get all the information about it, including dozens of photos.

You can download a QR reader app for free, then just hold your device’s camera over the code until it reads it. QR stands for Quick Response, and that’s what you get.

Any web page can have a QR code, but many real estate companies don’t have mobile-friendly sites, nor do they have individual web pages for each listing.

And here’s the QR code for this blog, BasicallyBainbridge: bb blue short qr

 

Open 12/15: Ferncliff Waterfront

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Next Sunday I’ll be holding open a stunning waterfront house at 8986 Ferncliff Avenue NE, Bainbridge Island from 1:00 to 3:00. Set on a shy wooded acre, this 5700 square foot masterpiece was completely remodeled in 2013. Sleek and sophisticated with stunning views of Seattle, Puget Sound and the Cascade Mountains.

A greenhouse always appeals to me, and the one on the lower left doesn’t disappoint:

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And some thumbnails, click to enlarge.

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For complete information, click HERE.

 

Open 12/1: Gorgeous Gardens at Ft. Ward

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I’ll be holding open 10132 NE Kitsap Street in the Fort Ward area of Bainbridge Island this Sunday, 12/1/2013 from 1:00 to 3:00.  As soon as you step into these nationally recognized horticultural gardens on 2.95 acres surrounding the dramatic single story Mediterranean-inspired home, you’ll feel like you are in another world. Buyer will have first chance at attached 2.49 acre lot for $245k. Generous, open spaces, with 3,669/sf, 4 bed/3.5 bath plus large office, give everyone a space to retreat. Newly remodeled master bath and new heat pump. A horticultural treasure listed with the Smithsonian Museum, the garden has been featured in numerous books and magazines and on the Bainbridge in Bloom garden tour.

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Risotto con Radicchio Trevisano

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When the weather gets cold, the radicchio turns red. Radicchio is Italian for a large group of chicories, both red and green, most of which are named after towns in the Veneto region of northern Italy. They can have an almost fleshy consistency, and are fairly bitter. In this country, the most common is the ball-shaped Rossa da Verona, and is usually seen raw in salads or as a trendy garnish, but in Italy, the most commonly eaten variety is the elongated Tresviso, and it is always cooked.

Both of these are forced-growth, meaning that after the first heading is removed, the root and all are moved to a dark shed to be forced, just like Belgian endive. There are also field-grown varieties which are the ones I grow, usually Chioggia and Castelfranco. Seeds for almost twenty varieties, including all these mentioned here, can be found at Seeds of Italy (http://www.growitalian.com/search.php?search_query=radicchio&x=0&y=0).

Several farmers at the Bainbridge Island Farmers’ Market grow Treviso, and you can often find it at The Town & Country Market on Bainbridge or at Whole Foods in Seattle. But the little round red one will work just fine for this risotto.

2 T olive oil
1 medium shallot, minced
1 head radicchio, 1/4 inch slices
1 cup risotto rice (Arborio, Vialone Nano, or Carnaroli)

1/2 cup red wine
4 cups broth, low boil
1/3 cup parmesan
1 T butter

Heat olive oil over medium – medium high heat in a saucepan.

Add shallot, stir/cook until softened, add radicchio, stir to coat.

Add rice, stir to coat and let it “toast” for 2 minutes. Add red wine, stir to evaporate the alcohol.

Add one ladle of broth, stir constantly with a wooden spoon until almost dry, then add another ladle. Continue adding full ladles when dry for about 20 minutes, then start using half ladles until rice grains are swollen but still al dente. Remove from heat.

Add butter and cheese, mix and serve.

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